Anchorage Climate Action Plan collaborators, including UAA and ISER faculty, are sponsoring a lunchtime talk Friday, August 9 in the ISER conference room, by Illinois Research Climatologist Ashish Sharma on how the most vulnerable in urban settings can be better protected from climate-related health challenges.  As extreme weather becomes the norm, the number of heat-related deaths around the world continues to rise, causing the media to coin the phrase, “heat, the silent killer.”  Dr. Sharma will discuss climate models, social vulnerability, and electricity consumption used to identify vulnerable neighborhoods in Chicago that would benefit from the green roofs or green infrastructure.

Ashish Sharma

Ashish Sharma

While most of the decisions made on urban management are based on systems scale, high-gradients in urban areas behoove sustainability decisions to be made on more local or microcosm scales. Questions arise on how to select such scales, their dimensions, and modeling. Dr. Sharma will illustrate the use of appropriate scales for urban climate and system-level modeling and observations for both built and natural environment (e.g., human comfort, urban heat island effects, green amenities). He will also discuss ways to develop an interdisciplinary approach for performing targeted green infrastructure implementation.

Ashish Sharma is the Illinois Research Climatologist at the Illinois State Water Survey at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests lie in atmospheric sciences and land/ocean-atmosphere interactions at a range of spatial scales (regional to local) that are relevant to the management of human and natural systems. His research focuses on reducing vulnerabilities and increasing readiness in urban, agricultural, and natural environments in a changing climate. He performs targeted dynamical downscaling experiments with the overarching goal of creating “bridges” between global, regional and micro-scale modeling. Another dimension of his research is to work at the intersection of science, engineering, and social sciences to perform collaborative and translational research that benefits society. He is a fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society and has projects funded by EPA and NSF.

ISER is located at 1901 Bragaw Street, Suite 301.